Maya lin vietnam war memorial essay

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Maya lin vietnam war memorial essay

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Early life[ edit ] Maya Lin was born in Athens, Ohio. Her parents had migrated to the United States from China, her father in and her mother inand settled in Ohio before Maya was born. Growing up, she did not have many friends and stayed home a lot.

She loved school and loved to study. When she was not studying, she took independent courses from Ohio University and spent her free time casting bronzes in the school foundry. It was not until her 30s that she had a desire to understand her cultural background.

Even the Vietnam Veterans Memorial is an earthwork. All of my work is about slipping things in, inserting an order or a structuring, yet making an interface so that in the end, rather than a hierarchy, there is a balance and tension between the man-made and the natural.

These issues are explored in what Lin calls her latest memorial, What Is Missing?. Lin also sits on the Natural Resources Defense Council board of trustees.

The design was initially very controversial for several reasons. It was an unconventional and non-traditional design for a war memorial.

The memorial has since become an important pilgrimage site for relatives and friends of the American military casualties in Vietnam, and personal tokens and mementos are left at the wall daily in the casualties' memory.

Lin believes that if the competition had not been "blind," with designs submitted by name instead of number, she "never would have won. Prominent businessman and later third party presidential candidate Ross Perot called her an "egg roll" after it was revealed that she was Asian.

The Three Soldiersa bronze statue of a group of soldiers and an American flagwas placed off to one side of her design.

However, the artist's architectural design was controversial due to particular aspects, such as the exclusion of the surviving veterans' names as well as the dark complexion of the granite. Many argue that the memorial only honors the soldiers who lost their lives during the Vietnam Warand others believe that the color of the granite resembles disgust and sadness towards this specific war.

Yet, a foot-high flagpole and an 8-foot-high statue of three soldiers were added to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial to appease any external pressures. She has tried to focus less on how politics influences design and more on what emotions the space would create and what it would symbolize to the user.

Her belief in a space being connected and the transition from inside to outside being fluid, coupled with what a space means, has led her to create some very memorable designs. She has also worked on sculptures and landscape installations.

In doing so, Lin focuses on memorializing concepts of time periods instead of direct representations of figures, creating an abstract sculptures and installations. She first imagines an artwork verbally to understand its concepts and meanings.Minimalism, Maya Lin and Vietnam Memorial Essay Words | 5 Pages Minimalism, Maya Lin and Vietnam Memorial Discussion “Minimal art is characterized by its simplicity in both form and content, where personal expression is removed in order to achieve this.

In asking myself what a memorial to a third world war would be, I came up with a political statement that was meant as a deterrent. I had studied earlier monuments and memorials while designing that memorial and I continued this research for the design of the Vietnam memorial.

Vietnam War Memorial original design submission by Maya Lin In , at 21 and still an undergraduate, Lin won a public design competition for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, beating 1, other competition submissions. [13]. He founded the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The designer of Entry Number 1, was Maya Ying Lin (The Vietnam Veteran's). Maya Lin was an undergraduate at Yale at the time of the design competition (The Vietnam Veteran's). /5(6). In asking myself what a memorial to a third world war would be, I came up with a political statement that was meant as a deterrent. I had studied earlier monuments and memorials while designing that memorial and I continued this research for the design of the Vietnam memorial.

Maya Lin is an American architect and sculptor best known for her design of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Synopsis Maya Lin was born on October 5, , in Athens, Ohio.

He founded the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The designer of Entry Number 1, was Maya Ying Lin (The Vietnam Veteran's).

Maya lin vietnam war memorial essay

Maya Lin was an undergraduate at Yale at the time of the design competition (The Vietnam Veteran's). /5(6).

Making Important Choices After ten years of shame, anger, and painful fights over US participation in the Vietnam War, the sacrifice and courage of the soldiers who fought was finally to be recognized and remembered. However, in light of the conflict surrounding the Vietnam War, the impact of the form of the memorial on the memorialization process and the overall memory of the Vietnam War remains in question.
Maya Lin - Wikipedia She hates Washington, and has rarely been back since her work was finished.
The History Reader - A History Blog from St. Martins Press As memorials are objects of public commemoration, we demand a lot of them.
Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund | Maya Lin's Original Proposal Lizzie Wells was a cook.
Book a Writing Consultation To achieve this effect she chose polished black granite for the walls.

Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, – March 25, ), more commonly known as Ida B. Wells, was an African-American investigative journalist, educator, and an early leader in the Civil Rights webkandii.com was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Maya lin vietnam war memorial essay

She arguably became the most famous . By Louis Menand “It was miserable,” Lin said when I first asked her about her year in Washington. “It was beyond miserable.” There is still indignation in her voice when she gets on the subject of the building of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

The “Black Gash of Shame”—Revisiting the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Controversy | Art21 Magazine